Choosing a Condo Plan That is Right for You – Part 2: Standard Condominiums

Post by: Carly Haynes

Standard Condominium Plans

Our previous blog post offered an introduction to vacant land condominium plans.  In this post we will examine standard condominium plans.

What is a Standard Condominium Plan?

A standard condominium plan is the traditional form of condominium that people tend to be most familiar with. Under previous condominium legislation in Ontario, only standard condominium plans could be created, as such, all condominium plans registered prior to May 5 2001 are standard condominiums.  Under Ontario’s new legislation, the  Condominium Act 1998 (“the Act”), a standard condominium plan is any condominium that is neither a leasehold condominium, nor any of the other types of freehold condominiums provided for in the Act (for example: common elements condominiums or vacant land condominiums).

Defining something by what it is not may not be very helpful, so what exactly is a standard condominium?

This type of condominium plan is typically comprised of completed buildings which are made up of units and common elements.  Some common elements, for example patios attached to the units, may be deemed exclusive use portions of the common elements, meaning that use of those spaces is reserved for specific unit owners only.  Other common elements may include exercise rooms, recreational facilities, roadways, green space and walkways. Notably, some units in a standard condominium can be left empty at the time of condominium registration, such as parking units, or units intended for commercial or industrial (not residential) use.

Finally, prior to the registration of a standard condominium plan all proposed buildings within the plan must be constructed to the level required by the Act regulations, which is also what forms the basis of “Schedule G” of a standard condominium plan.  Schedule G includes an engineer’s or architect’s certificate (or combination), as to the status of the construction of the condominium’s buildings. A completed Schedule G must be included as part of the condominium declaration in order for the declaration to be registered along with the description plans.

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Why Develop a Standard Condominium Plan?

One benefit of standard condominiums is that proposed standard condominium units can be marketed to potential unit purchasers prior to obtaining draft plan approval from the approval authority (this is also the case with common elements condominiums and phased condominiums).

Also, pursuant to the regulations, the municipality is not required to provide notice of a public meeting for the approval of a standard condominium plan to the surrounding community nor is any circulation to any agencies required. This factor may increase the efficiency of the development.

The Downside of Standard Condominium Plans

The buildings in a standard condominium plan must all be built at one time, without phasing, therefore substantial construction capital may be necessary at the outset of a project, especially if marketing of the units is slow. Phasing the condominium plan offers a solution to this issue, and will be discussed in the following blog.

Finally, pursuant to the Tarion New Home Warranties Act a developer is required to post security to enroll the condominium in Tarion. Registration with Tarion must occur at least 30 (thirty) days before construction begins.

In our next blog post, we will discuss phasing of  standard condominium plans.

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Converting lands to “Land Titles Absolute” before condominium registration

Post by: Craig Robson

In Ontario, before a condominium can register, the lands must be registered in “Land Titles Absolute” or “Land Titles Plus”.  These are the highest categories of title available under the Land Titles Act.  Most Ontario lands continue to be “Land Titles Conversion Qualified”.  The “Conversion Qualified” category has qualifiers that do not apply to the “Absolute” and “Plus” categories, including the qualifier that “Conversion Qualified” lands are subject to “any title or lien that, by possession or improvements, the owner or person interested in any adjoining land has acquired to or in respect of the land”.

The application to convert requires a title search by the project lawyer and a boundary survey by the project surveyor.  The boundary survey is circulated to the neighbouring land owners with a warning that if they do nothing the boundary shown on the survey will be certified as the true boundary of their property.  If a neighbour does not agree with the boundary, then the neighbour can object to the application.

In greenfield developments there are usually far fewer boundary issues than exist in built up areas. In built up areas, very often fences are constructed “off boundary”, sheds encroach and significant use has been made of the proposed condominium property by neighbours.  If the property has been vacant for some time, this use can be significant and long standing.

It is important to respond to neighbour’s objections in a principled fashion to minimize potential for delays in the conversion process, which if lengthy can also delay condominium registration.

For more on options for responding to objections to your LTA conversion application, check out our earlier blog article here: “Responding to Objections to an Application to Convert to LTA”.

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